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Author Topic: Fewer Lids: one more reason I like the code  (Read 2287 times)

cockpitbob

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Fewer Lids: one more reason I like the code
« on: July 03, 2016, 12:15:37 AM »
I just added another item to my list of why I like Morse code.  I encounter far fewer lids when I operate CW.

I don't operate a lot of SSB and I rarely join a pile-up.  However every year I participate in the 13-Colonies week long special event.  This year they added a station in England.  Tonight I tried to work it SSB and the behavior in the pile-up was disgusting.  It seemed like some lids deliberately tried to be as annoying as possible so the U.K. station would work them so they would go away.  People were calling in ridiculously late.  When the U.K. station switched to working numbers ("2 stations only please") stations outside of that call number repeatedly called anyway.  There was even a little tiff when one of those stations got called a jerk by someone in the pile-up and the lid station replied with "screw you".  The good old USA put on a pretty poor showing for that U.K. station tonight.  I was mad and embarrassed.

RadioRay

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Re: Fewer Lids: one more reason I like the code
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2016, 05:10:02 PM »
The good news is that in the USA, anyone can get a radio license.

The Bad news is that in the USA, anyone can get a radio license.

I totally agree about CW being a bit of a behaviour filter.  Before the days of computer CW, I virtually never heard anyone take the time to tap out cuss works and etc. However, without a doubt, my best conversations are on CW. 

Digital is amazingly effective, but :
1. For me it's not enjoyable being at a keyboard.

2.  Digital modes make it very easy to send a bunch of canned messages, so people do. A shame really, because digital can provide for great conversations - if the canned 'brag' and other messages were eliminated.

3.  CW is simple radio + ears and a way to press the key.




>RadioRay ..._  ._
"When we cannot do the good we would, we must be ready to do the good we can."  ~ Matthew Henry

gil

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Re: Fewer Lids: one more reason I like the code
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2016, 06:28:35 AM »
I couldn't agree more of course.

I find it difficult to find people willing to chat however. Now it's all 5NN73, short meaningless contacts. Almost as if people don't have anything to say anymore. We are so used to texting and sites like Facebook, we forgot how to really communicate. Soon there will be a "LIKE" prosign :-( I guess it's FB.. Send a bunch of FB and BT ended by 73 SK and you have your QSO..

I went to a Ham radio club here. The guys were doing digital.. Nothing but macros, click-buttons.. They didn't type a single sentence the whole time I was there. To their credits, Hams in France are very knowledgeable technically. The digital interface was homebrew. The club has a PCB making station.. Hell, the club was founded in 1921 and they still have some old rigs from way back. There aren't enough Hams here tough because getting the license is such an ordeal and costs $50/year.

I am disappointed by SSB. I was hoping conversations would be of a higher caliber than on VHF/UHF. They are, but all they talk about is the weather or amplifiers, how to have perfect audio.. These guys' shacks must look like the cabin of a 747, not to mention the huge beam antennas. All that to say "you're 59, 73." Might as well use Skype..

On CW you find the same guys, but also some interesting ones operating outside using interesting rigs. When I hear a wobbling tone from a simple tube rig I jump on it! I want to know what the guy is running. CW guys usually don't run 500W, they know it's just heating up the atmosphere.

I do get the occasional LID who ignores me and starts calling CQ again as soon as he figures I'm not playing his game. I can't understand keyboard CW. Why not use PSK31 then? Then don't even need a keyboard, they can click on buttons and send macros.

In a large scale emergency these guys are going to send 5NN. ::)

Who has message relaying skills anymore? I don't even think the ARRL is doing anything in CW anymore but their daily practice sessions, which I applaud them for, even though it's clearly broadcasting. Is NTS still active? Is there a worldwide NTS?

Gil.

Kinsanosim

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Re: Fewer Lids: one more reason I like the code
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2017, 02:54:05 AM »
I do not want to think that I will get good information in this way.

RadioRay

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Re: Fewer Lids: one more reason I like the code
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2017, 02:49:52 PM »
An other reason why I love communicating in Morse is the SIMPLICITY.  The major topics I see where my friends who use ( very effective ) digital are concerned:
1. Windows Failure.
2. Interface failure, problems
3. Driver failure - or drivers changed during Windows updates causing failure.
4. RF feedback causing fail and lost time to reboot - repeat as necessary.
5. Trying to transport all this 'stuff' to a field camp and use it.

For me, I find Morse to be most efficient, simple, reliable and THRIFTY. No computer needed, no interface box, no software -updates-or compatibility issues.  no Heil microphone no SSB circuitry required and rarely any intentional interference, except by contesters and their canned computer macro 'CW'. Analog VFO or digital - it does not matter, because a few Hz drift will no harm Morse communication. Because of all this, I save a huge amount of money too: simple/older transceiver; $450 for my older Kenwood home station. My QRP rigs are anywhere from a few dollars to a maximum of under $300 - when new, 20 years ago. I do not need a 20-25 Amp power supply, because my 5 Watt Morse signal is as understandable as the 100 Watt SSB voice signal under the same conditions - better, if the other station knows how to use their narrow filters. 

SSB can be fun, I participate in the occasional net, where voice is a requirement.  OTOH - I have roundtable Morse skeds during the week and they are tremendously enjoyable and reliable.

Another plus: here in the United States, HF Morse privileges begin with the entry level Technician License.  Few use it, which is a shame, but it's there.  30-some questions and a small amount of money for a transceiver for Morse - and you're on the air with NVIS, medium and long range communications capability. Easy-peezy


73 de RadioRay  ..._  ._
« Last Edit: May 22, 2017, 11:56:45 PM by RadioRay »
"When we cannot do the good we would, we must be ready to do the good we can."  ~ Matthew Henry

gil

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Re: Fewer Lids: one more reason I like the code
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2017, 03:40:01 PM »
Quote
no Heil microphone

Hi Ray. I've always wondered about those... Transmitting a 3KHz wide signal with a $500 (or more!) microphone has me baffled. Of course, they often use more than 3KHz, but even then... I remember paying $2 shipping included for two microphones for my KX3, the computer type, from China. I got great audio reports :o For my KX2 I use a cheap Astatic, though I might make a smaller microphone, just an Electret capsule and a small button... I doubt the extra money spent on a studio quality microphone helps to communicate. I think of my RT-320's punchy "military" audio with not too much bass and good compression, with a 25 handset...

I just got a ZLP MiniProSC interface and was looking at FSQ... Then I thought, why bother? I know Morse code. FSQ might be more efficient for weak signal work but like you point out, the extra gear isn't worth the trouble. I'll use the interface for Winlink and that's pretty much it.

Given the cost of CW radios, starting at $3.50, and $50 for a great 1-Watter, the choice is easy. Preppers are not all into radio and Morse can be used so many ways...

Gil.

swxx

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Re: Fewer Lids: one more reason I like the code
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2017, 11:27:19 AM »
I virtually never heard anyone take the time to tap out cuss works and etc. ... on CW. 
It's a pity that the international and forgotten but never officially mentioned universal swear word [insert swear word in your own language here] isn't used in amateur radio. I use it but no one understands it. It was used extensively by ship radio officers, from some nations more than others. It is the original "!" in CW which later became the comma "," i.e. --..-- and usually sent as -- . . -- (MEEM) for emphasis. You can even send that slowly and forcefully pounding with the side of your fist on a straight key! And it sounds much better than English words hurled as insults, which I have heard used by frequency policemen-without-badges in DX pile ups.

Who has message relaying skills anymore? I don't even think the ARRL is doing anything in CW anymore but their daily practice sessions, which I applaud them for, even though it's clearly broadcasting. Is NTS still active? Is there a worldwide NTS?
Yes, well, no. There should be. But yes within the USA there is, they regrouped the serious ones after ARRL-NTS failed to kill them them off with politics when jealousies came to a head over an exercise with FEMA called Cascadia Rising. Very intereresting results from that exercise which FEMA wanted messages sent from East Coast to West Coast in encrypted groups, and CW came out on top even ahead of Pactor. It is called Radio Relay International. And they are welcoming of international liaisons. Something smaller called CWB is also there of late and the two cooperate. But there is a long way to go INTERNATIONALLY or globally. http://radio-relay.org

RadioRay

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Re: Fewer Lids: one more reason I like the code
« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2017, 08:23:25 PM »
EEE de ASA

Thanks !!! RadioRelay International - 

I  was on the periphery of that Cascadia Rising and got to read some of the inside information from non-ARRL screened sources and WOW , the ARRL went into a tail spin when Morse code slightly outperformed their coveted digital NTS for end-to-end throughput and accuracy and blew it away in reliability per Watts consumed.  Error correcting GIGO was a problem.  Typos on an error correcting mode as still typos. The grid down portion is especially impressive , with no computers to power.

Radio + Ears and a way to push the key is all that's needed for a person with Morse a dn tiny bit of practice.

« Last Edit: August 28, 2017, 08:43:03 PM by RadioRay »
"When we cannot do the good we would, we must be ready to do the good we can."  ~ Matthew Henry