Radio Preppers

General Category => General Discussion => Topic started by: gil on May 09, 2012, 02:11:40 PM

Title: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on May 09, 2012, 02:11:40 PM
Information is a vital commodity in a disaster situation. Whomever has any, in the absence of Internet, phone and power services will have a great advantage.

Radio Preppers aims to provide individuals interested in disaster preparedness with an independent tool for the exchange of information about emergency radio communications and preparations. Hopefully it will also help build a community of like-minded individuals who could contact and help each others in times of what is commonly known as 'SHTF' or 'TEOTWAWKI.' Like-minded here means self-sufficient, strong-willed and responsible people. Independent means regardless of nationality, race, gender, political and religious beliefs, as well as unrelated to any organizations. Whether you are a licensed HAM operator, CBer, or simply curious about radio preparedness doesn't matter here.

My motivation for creating this site came from my inability to find an emergency radio club that really wasn't related to some kind of organization, mostly governmental or politically affiliated. Survival is a personal, family or small community affair. I am always suspicious of organizations that plan on telling people what to do for their own good, or else... That said, anti-government rhetoric will not be accepted here. If you don't like your government, vote accordingly. There are plenty of other boads for political ranting. This one is not one of them.

Sign-up, it's free, and stop by once in a while. If you have anything to contribute, please do so! Topics will not necessarily be limited to radio but must be related to disaster preparedness. To avoid spamming, you do need to answer a couple radio related questions; nothing a quick Google search can't answer.

Rules are few: Be courteous. Although some civil political discussions are acceptable, try to avoid them; same goes for religion. Do not suggest anything against the law, or you will be immediately banned.

Please consider supporting this site after joining by subscribing at: Profile > Summary > Actions > Paid Subscriptions. You will get more privileges!

Note that members who do not participate at least once a year will be deleted.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. I hope you enjoy this forum and that it helps make you and your family safer.

Gil.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: K7SZ on June 12, 2012, 03:36:14 PM
Gil:

Tnx for starting something that I personally feel is long over due. I have been licensed almost 50 years and have been active in ARES/RACES for over 30 years. I am tired or these politically oriented organizations with their insistence on useless training courses that anyone can take over the internet. These courses won't make better communicators. I also think that the individual communicator (ham, CBer or individual with FRS/GMRS) who is savvy about the craft of radio can make a tremendous difference in times of unrest. It's the individual, NOT the organization, that communicates.

73 Rich K7SZ
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on June 12, 2012, 04:00:43 PM
Hello Rich,

I couldn't agree more. I would also rather trust a number of individuals reporting important events rather than some agency.. ARES/RACES probably have the merit of providing a structure and a liaison between disaster relief agencies and the public, but I do not think it is enough. More people with radios, off the grid, is in my opinion the way to obtain and disseminate potentially life-saving information. I am pro-government and pro-law-and-order mind you, but I prefer to be self-sufficient. Many Hams today would probably not be able to use their equipment without power. Others might have very little fuel stored for a generator. A car battery also doesn't last very long.. personally am leaning towards QRP with solar panels.. My newly built K1 draws 55mA on receive...

Thank you for signing up, have a great day,

Gil.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Jim Boswell on June 21, 2012, 05:50:30 PM
Interesting,
Someone with the ability to take equipment at hand and relay a message is what counts. If you use tin cans and string, fine get the job done with what you have on hand. The skill to adapt technology at hand is what counts.
The past 20 years have seen a major downturn in the skill level of hams. Now most hams can't repair their own equipment not to mention build or tune antennas.
At one of our club meetings I mentioned I preform monthly SWR checks on my HF antennas. Some people said they just use their auto tuner. I questioned how would you determine if you had water in the coax if you rely on a auto tuner? Besides I tune my antennas correctly so I don't need to use a tuner.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on June 22, 2012, 09:50:35 PM
Hello Jim,

Welcome aboard :-) I did read all your posts with great interest. I am sure you will have knowledge to share on this board, and that is great.

I am new to Ham, though not new to radio and electronics.. I thought most Hams still did tinker with equipment, but I guess, not so much. Now I am busy learning Morse code... I also built three transceivers so far, including an Elecraft K1. I have a second Rock-Mite on order :-)

That said, my main goal with this board is to educate people interested in emergency preparedness on how to choose and use (even build?) radios which could help them gather information in SHTF scenarios, and communicate with others.. I am no expert, but hopefully, some will join us here..

Have a great week-end,

Gil.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: rockymtnsurvival on July 26, 2012, 11:41:03 AM
As you probably know, the Tech test basically has very little theory in it, but it has more concerning the rules and the traditions of ham radio.  It may be a "joke", but it does help to keep the ham bands somewhat free of the CB mentality and language.  Unfortunately, there are portions on some of the bands that rival the CB as far a language.  Unfortunately, when they dropped the code part of the exam, they opened the door to many who really don't know what they are doing, and don't really know what or how they are doing it.

Rules on the ham bands, most of them gentlemen's/ladies agreements are there for a purpose, and serve a purpose to keep the traditions alive and well in hamdom.  Please don't minimize the tests because they might be a "joke" to you, but they do serve a time honored purpose.  I passed the Tech and General the same night, and nearly passed the Extra, but had to come back the next test session to pass it.

Having been, and still am involved in some large prepper comms groups, I have found that most people can pass the tests, but they fail to purchase the equipment to practice those skills.  Therefore, they are useless to the group, and especially themselves and their families.

I hope that those who frequent this site don't fall into that category.  Purchase your equipment and become proficient in their use.  Just sayin...
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: HS-LD on September 01, 2012, 08:58:51 PM
You know, long time Ham people can discount the new Technician test and requirements and I appreciate where they're coming from, but consider the prepper who wants to add communications to their preps and appreciates the great resource Ham is but doesn't have the time to spend WEEKS or MONTHS studying just to get a basic license. I fall into that category. In a perfect world, I'd be getting my General right now, and really want to so I can actually test out my Yaesu 857D, but for right now, I'm content to just listen. And have that listening capability if things get bad. In the mean time I can use my VHF/UHF mobile and learn at my own pace. Scanning fire/police/public service and weather all the while. I'm not about to use bad language, and can use my VHF/UHF legally. The new technician license is a great entry level in my opinion. It's enough to get you 100% of the benefits in emergency, and still requires people to take a test thus keeping the riff raff at bay a bit... Heck I got my technician license in 2007 and am just now getting around to going to the local club meetings. It's taken that long to get the time free.  :)
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: lima6 on September 01, 2012, 09:52:17 PM
Thanks for welcoming me on board. As you well know, the ability to provide security, transportation food/water, and shelter along with our communications is also important.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: normancf22 on September 01, 2012, 10:38:40 PM
Just wanted to introduce myself. My name is Norm call sign W6NCF and am located in the the Santa Clara Valley in California. I hold an Extra Class license but am not a more code person. I prefer the HF digital modes over voice and have put together a radio bug out kit that includes VHF/UHF/HF for voice and digital. I volunteer with the city R.A.C.E.S group and help with communications and transportation for local bicycle events. Relatively speaking I've only been a Ham for a shot time. I returned to ham radio in 2002 so I'm not an old timer and still learning. I hope I can learn for others and maybe pass some of the things that I have learned to others.

Norm W6NCF
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Scott on September 01, 2012, 11:13:22 PM
Checking in.

No, this is not my real call sign.  :)
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: billca on September 02, 2012, 08:50:09 AM
Hi folks,

Like Normancf22, I'm in the lovely Silicon Valley too.  I'm a recent HAM (tech) and fall into that category of someone who's not steeped in electronics but wants the utility of HAM for both emergency and general use. 

The goal of prepping is to be prepared for most foreseeable events (e.g. "the big one"). Radios give us the ability to keep in touch with others to understand what's happening locally as well as in other areas. That info can be crucial to helping smaller groups cope after a disaster. It can also help local neighborhoods coordinate resources for aid and safety.  That's my outlook on it.

So, tech licensed, currently using a Yaesu FT-60R HT (2m/70cm) around Sunnyvale-Mt.View. Eventually I want to expand to include 6M or 23cm (not decided yet). 



Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on September 02, 2012, 10:02:25 AM
Hello,

I would like to welcome all new members who joined us here this week-end following a link from survivalblog.com.
Thank you to whomever posted it, and thank you all for the great posts  :)

Gil.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Jonas Parker on September 02, 2012, 12:04:37 PM
I just wanted to check in. A forum like this is long overdue. Thanks for taking your time, effort, and treasure to do it, Gil!

JP
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: underhill on September 02, 2012, 12:26:40 PM
Just wanted to post a checkin, thanks for starting this forum, a useful mix.  I'm in the So Cal area, anyone down here?

Underhill
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: bu2chlc on September 02, 2012, 03:25:14 PM
I am in Cal City
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gafarmboy on September 02, 2012, 10:58:22 PM
Greetings,
I am an absolute newbie to Short Wave. I recently was given a FRG-7 and want to learn more about short wave. I saw this site listed on Survivalblog.com and decided to have a look. So prepare for a barrage of questions. I have no clue about this subject in general except that I am keenly interested.
Gafarmboy
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Sunflower on September 03, 2012, 01:07:34 AM
I am real new to HAM. I have some back up radios on hand (shortwave). I keep a faraday cage and have stuff in it.

Not sure if I have the temperment or intellect to operate a radio. I am not very tech friendly, but do enjoy light mechanics. I take pleasure in fixing something, though I have fixed much in years. Busy with nursingcare like needs in the home.

I do have some preparations for an emergency underway. Got into high step just 4 years ago. Seems like  I would feel ready. Well, I can't say I am "ready" but as least I am not anxious and worried with a feeling of drede. Prepping is taking action and taking action calms my nerves.

I have been interested in Morse Code for some time - years off and on. I will start to study it and then put it on the back burner. I am 51 years old, an artist, and have no experience with operating or even listening to the kind of radio that a HAM would use.

I was first introduced to HAM at work many years ago. A main Director for this Aerospace Co was generous enough to give me a tour of the HAM station. He was the only HAM at this facility on the foothills at the time (if I recall correctly). I was very impressed with his appoach to have a backup plan for communicating with the head facility near the beach.

The only HAM in the family passed away several years ago. The idea of dealing with a bunch of Govt paperwork to have access to HAM strikes me as down point.  I am joining this forum to help me get acquainted with the language of HAM, and maybe ultimately become a technician or what ever it is I need to do to have a radio on site (learn what to buy, how to set up, and how to use).

Not sure if I have the desire to have my own call signs, or watch a clock so I can get on to just have every one listen.  I use a hard line telephone at home. I have a cell phone in the car for real emergencies. I use a computer, but am overwelmed by a video player and satelite TV.

Thank you for letting me register.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on September 03, 2012, 02:41:52 AM
Sunflower, you make an interesting comment, and you are not the only one, about the perceived complexity of Ham radio. I say perceived, because it doesn't have to be. Although I am a programmer by trade, I do not like complex radios. I spend too much time as it is using menus and complex interfaces. I like my radios to have a volume button and tune button, and not much else! The least the better. More features does not make a radio transmit better. It does make it hear better sometimes, but bells and whistles are optional. My favorite radio, one I build myself, is the Elecraft K1. It isn't the simplest, does use menus and has a few knobs and buttons, but remains very easy to use, small, and has a very low current draw. Anything more complex, I shy away from. Let's face it, if I can't explain to someone how to use it in a few minutes, there is a potential problem there... I can't teach Morse code to someone in 5 minutes of course, but SSB (Single Side Band voice) radios can be simple too. Look at the MFJ-9440 or an old Atlas... That's the kind of simplicity I like. With the Tech exam being so accessible, why not? Sure, it's a pain to have to pass an exam and be "registered," but to practice, you need to get on the air. When the SHTF is not a good time to learn. You could use CB and learn a lot about antennas of course, but you limit yourself to one band that only allows long distance communications in the best of conditions.

By the way, other members can thank you for suggesting the "New To Radio" board, it is on.

Gil.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: ScottHW on September 03, 2012, 07:47:51 AM
I am in the same boat as billca, in that I am new to HAM, Tech license, same motivations, SAME starter rig.   I have very little time to spend on it but don't want to lose what skill and knowledge I have.  I have the General Study Guide sitting on my desk, waiting to be opened.   I have yet to speak to anyone on the air but have listened a lot.  If I had time to go to local club meetings I might have motivation to talk on air but so far that hasn't happened.

Thanks for starting his board, I will be checking in daily and hopefully will have something to add.

Scott

Hi folks,

Like Normancf22, I'm in the lovely Silicon Valley too.  I'm a recent HAM (tech) and fall into that category of someone who's not steeped in electronics but wants the utility of HAM for both emergency and general use. 

The goal of prepping is to be prepared for most foreseeable events (e.g. "the big one"). Radios give us the ability to keep in touch with others to understand what's happening locally as well as in other areas. That info can be crucial to helping smaller groups cope after a disaster. It can also help local neighborhoods coordinate resources for aid and safety.  That's my outlook on it.

So, tech licensed, currently using a Yaesu FT-60R HT (2m/70cm) around Sunnyvale-Mt.View. Eventually I want to expand to include 6M or 23cm (not decided yet).
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: RadioRay on September 07, 2012, 01:12:09 PM
Hello Gil and the rest of the Fellows -

I'm new to Gil's forum, a long time ham - going on forty years on the air now.  I've done a lot of backwoods radio, both in the US and outside of the country and even aboard a sailboat for a few years. Having worked communications under some pretty dire field conditions and also played a lot in the mountain west with my QRP rigs, CW is absolutely my favorite and most dependable mode. 

These days, I'm looking more at how to make our little home more self sufficient, communications being the strong point, followed by 'mini-farming' and etc. It's clear that we're in trouble as a nation.  In my past, I worked a lot with refugees from the communist bloc.  Virtually all of them said of their over-run homelands: "we never thought that it would happen here". At least they had an America to escape to.  I think that learning to communicate withOUT commercial infrastructure would be very helpful, even if nothing drastic ever happens. If - God forbid - it should happen, then at least we have some options and sources of raw information outside of the controlled media.


73 de Ray
W7ASA ..._ ._
Title: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on September 07, 2012, 01:51:43 PM
Hi Ray, you should post pictures of your KX1 on the technical board ;)

Gil
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Sunflower on November 25, 2012, 10:47:56 PM
Just wanted to post a checkin, thanks for starting this forum, a useful mix.  I'm in the So Cal area, anyone down here?

Underhill
Use to be. Glad I am gone from the place. Miss the family, but not enough to go back. If I relocate ever again it is North only. I miss clam digging and body surfing, but not enough to return. There was a lot of HAM fun going on when I was out there. That is where I was first introduced to it.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Brad-W5BS on January 24, 2013, 04:31:49 PM
Hello, Gil and all. Thanks for setting this up. I found you in survival comms yahoo group. I am another "40 yr" ham. But my three daughters never got interested in ham radio. So, I am going to use GMRS to keep in touch. Myself and some of the hams here are going to set up a GMRS repeater this year. I have Wouxun and Baofeng handhelds. I like having one radio that covers ham VHF / UHF, GMRS and MURS. ( I was going to say FRS but that would be illegal ;) One thing I like about MURS is that packet is legal there, except digipeating. I will be reading the whole forum to see what's up. Thanks again!
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on January 24, 2013, 04:45:16 PM
Welcome aboard Brad!

Gil.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Ken on May 27, 2013, 10:39:41 PM
I am really enjoying Radio Preppers! The other preparedness organizations in my area have been crippled by petty politics. Thank you Gil, I look forward to a QSO someday.
Ken - ke4rg
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Joe on May 27, 2013, 11:20:38 PM


Welcome aboard Ken!!!
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: KK0G on May 27, 2013, 11:37:54 PM
I am really enjoying Radio Preppers! The other preparedness organizations in my area have been crippled by petty politics. Thank you Gil, I look forward to a QSO someday.
Ken - ke4rg

Welcome Ken. What I love about this forum is that we all seem to be like minded and there's no petty bickering and arguing. We may not always agree on everything, there might even be a spirited debate, but from what I've seen it's always done in a respectful manner. I think you're gonna like it here.
Title: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on May 27, 2013, 11:48:51 PM
Sure thing Ken, welcome aboard!

Gil
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: wuzafuzz on June 29, 2014, 11:41:29 AM
Found this board and decided to join for the discussions.  Any chance of adding a Colorado forum?  I know a LOT of prepper minded radio folks here.

I'm deeply involved in emergency communications, using amateur radio, GMRS, and even Civil Air Patrol comms.  I find it all to be rewarding and a lot of fun.

Eric
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Joe on June 29, 2014, 07:16:55 PM
Welcome aboard Eric

There are a lot of great people here. To add a state board and to make sure Gil see's it head over here to the state board request area, and post there. Or fallow my link.
http://radiopreppers.com/index.php/topic,321.0.html

73
Joe
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: NavySEAL on August 29, 2014, 03:12:57 PM
I just  signed up W0UDT
 
Name is Bob

Location Colorado
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: RichardSinFWTX on August 29, 2014, 04:00:26 PM
Welcome, Bob!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on August 29, 2014, 05:53:01 PM
Welcome aboard Bob, you'll find yourself right at home here  :)

Gil.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: RadioRay on August 29, 2014, 05:53:50 PM
Hi Bob,

Nice callsign!


de RadioRay ..._  ._
W7ASA
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: KK0G on August 30, 2014, 09:25:48 AM
Welcome to the forum Bob.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: pea on January 07, 2015, 11:03:58 AM
Hello Everyone,

It's a pleasure meeting you. I was delighted to find this place, thanks for making it available.

I've been a ham for 12 years now. Upgraded to General last year and am working on my Extra. Look forward to hopefully meeting some of you on the air.

Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: ABaze on March 14, 2015, 11:16:54 AM
Hi Everyone,

I'm new to the forum as well, and looking forward to learning and helping as I'm able. I've been interested in this space for quite a while. :-)

Andrew Baze, AB8L
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: scarr on January 22, 2017, 09:54:04 AM
Hi folks, name is Dave - I'm a ham in Ireland, licensed since 2012. From the start I've been interested in how to stay on the air if the power quits.

Equipment at the moment is ok for staying put, but I'm slowly putting together the kit necessary to stay out in the field indefinitely.

Main mode is CW but also active on WSPR and some other digital modes. Have a QRO rig that's currently sitting in a drawer, so my main radio is an FT817ND and I have a HB1B as backup. I operate QRP mainly due to the practicalities - small and light make it easier for me to move around, often find myself using internal antennas so QRO isn't a great idea.

Had been thinking about a PRC320 for a long time, but have decided against it for now as it would mean more equipment to work with 24-28vdc.

Hope to work you guys on the air at some point.

73
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on January 22, 2017, 10:08:09 AM
Welcome Dave!

Here is how I deal with charging batteries for the 320.. Right now I can charge 18650 cells with a 14W solar panel, then use four of those to power a  Supernova nicad charger to charge the Clansman batteries. I could also simply charge two 12v gel cell batteries with a larger panel and charge controller..

The RT-320 also has a manual charger to be used with a 1Ah battery. Tedious work but does charge the battery, albeit slowly.

Gil
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: scarr on January 22, 2017, 11:32:07 AM
Interesting Gil.

I had thought about getting an empty battery box and installing a 12V LiFePO4 alongside a 12V/24V boost converter to simplify things - 24v for rig, 12v input for charging - but then read that these converters are very noisy, so I decided to stick with the 817!

I'll throw up some pics as I get my setup together for the outdoors - I'm spending a lot of time at the moment trying to figure out how to make it a bit more manpack like, without making it too bulky.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on January 22, 2017, 12:04:46 PM
Great thanks. I have a 7S LIPO for the 320 as well.. Looking forward to your photos.

Gil
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Jim Boswell on January 23, 2017, 12:25:26 PM
Gil, I just wanted to say Thank You. You have a good forum here. Over the years I have learned some and hopefully helped others. 73'S KA5SIW
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on January 24, 2017, 03:34:49 AM
Thanks Jim! We do have a good community here and I have learned much as well :-) I especially like it when people try stuff and post the results to benefit us all.

Gil
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Pensioner Prepper on April 27, 2017, 05:55:01 AM
Hi Gil

Have subscribed to your YouTube channel and really like the idea of a Prepper's HF frequency. Practicing morse every day now, I do struggle with it but overall I am sure it is worth the effort.

I am an active member of Uk Raynet in North Anglia and have been for over 10 years.

Basically a homestead sort of Prepper with a small group. We all live in the same little village and have our own Radio UHF network. As we all live within 1/2 km of each other PMR/FRS work well for us.

Best wishes Larry.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on April 27, 2017, 07:55:27 AM
Excellent Larry! I don't know the UK Raynet but I participate in the VMARS net on Wednesday nights on 3615...

Welcome aboard :)

Gil.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: bkt on April 27, 2017, 06:02:48 PM
Hi, folks. I'm a long-time prepper and have had my license for a couple years now. Having seen a few youtube videos by Gil, I thought it would be smart to join up here and learn a lot. :)
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on April 28, 2017, 03:15:17 AM
Welcome aboard!

Sent from my SM-G928F using Tapatalk

Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: KK0G on April 28, 2017, 08:37:50 AM
Welcome to the forum bkt, glad to have you aboard.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Jon_Garfio on June 03, 2017, 03:06:00 AM
Hi Gil and all the members of this forum.
I am 41 years old and I have my ham licence from 1993 (I was 17 yo). I come from Spain.

Sorry for my poor English, I 'll try to explain as better has possible.

I discovered this forum throught radioprepper channel, I am glad to know anothers friends with the same interest about the priority to comms in a possible dissaster or SHFP.

I don't trust in the help of goverments, neither in his false information.

This comunity/forum allows me share my ideas of radio lightweight/portable etc to get at this hobby became a important tool for SHFP.

I hope we can learn more all together and make a net to share info and knowlegde.


Enviado desde mi iPad utilizando Tapatalk Pro
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on June 03, 2017, 04:57:00 AM
We should be able to establish contact between France/Spain Jon...
Gil.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Jon_Garfio on June 03, 2017, 07:07:05 AM
We should be able to establish contact between France/Spain Jon...
Gil.

I wish it!!
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on June 03, 2017, 07:22:41 AM
We should be able to establish contact between France/Spain Jon...
Gil.

I wish it!!
I should be on 20m this afternoon, 14060 around 15:30 French time, 13:30Z See F4WBY on the reverse beacon network...

Gil

Sent from my SM-G928F using Tapatalk

Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Moray on July 03, 2017, 05:29:45 PM
Hello everyone, my name is Moray located south of Glasgow in bonnie Scotland. Have been inspired with Gil and his YouTube videos very interesting. I have an RT-320 and I am active most weekends like experimenting with various antennas. They are great radios and a bit of nostalgia for me being ex army look forward to spending time in here reading posts and contributing.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on July 03, 2017, 06:06:40 PM
Welcome aboard Moray. I am a big fan of the 320, but you already know that ;)

Gil.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Moray on July 03, 2017, 07:11:08 PM
Yes I know it's a great radio hope to speak to you on the bands I to hate contests :)
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on July 04, 2017, 02:20:14 AM
We'll try!
Gil

Sent from my SM-G928F using Tapatalk

Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: kb9lxh on July 04, 2017, 01:41:17 PM
Thank you for providing this forum. I agree with you and others that preparedness in all forms, especially in communications, is the utmost importance for all types of disasters whether the source is naturally occurring or man-caused. As a ham radio operator for over 35 years and a military retiree, preparedness is second-nature to me and my family. We look forward to great dialogue with others.

73,

Joe - KB9LXH
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Jon_Garfio on July 04, 2017, 04:42:16 PM
Nice words, Joe.



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Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Commsguy on August 16, 2017, 07:29:58 AM
Hello everyone,

I'm a prepper located in Western Europe and I stumbled upon this forum in the links section of the webpage of OH8STN - awesome to find an entire forum dedicated to ham radio & preparedness, without too much focus on only either of those topics, but the best intersection where both topics meet.

As a prepper I got in to ham radio & comms-gear a few years ago when I picked up a scanner and later a few chinese HT's and I extensively started testing ranges to get a good understanding of communication capabilities. A huge pet-peeve within the prepper communities are people buy a few Baofengs and basically make grotesque assumptions on their capabilities or usefulness, nor not even practice using & operating their radios. Not to mention how little time people spend on finding & evaluating the right or up-to-date frequencies to get news or information from.

I've come to the conclusion that 2m & 70cm is pretty much only useful for short-range, tactical communications for those people in your prepper group that are very near or with whom you are directly working together. For instance the neighborhood watch, on patrol or in vehicle convoys or vehicle to dismounted. Unless Party A and Party B both have Diamond VHF/UHF antennas on their roof, I've kept VHF & UHF prepper communications within 5 Miles tactical range (that is with external DIY antenna's but not in any optimum situation. Better to be conservative with range rather than overestimate). For obvious reasons I do not wish to rely on amateur repeaters.

That brings me to my next and latest research, where I've spent the last year looking into: NVIS. I've already ready a few threads on this forum and I've spend so much time reading all available articles and research into, ranging from the USMC antenna books to the latest research on NVIS from 2015 (http://www.vederfonds.veron.nl/PhD%20Thesis%20B.A.Witvliet%202015.pdf)

A few problems I can't get around are so many articles praising NVIS on 40 meters. Most of the amateur radio articles on NVIS are from the United States, and I have some problems with that:

A close friend recently started prepping as well and I want to establish a (for HF very) short-range method of communication. The ranges to think of are 15 to 75 miles. I'm having the hardest time with finding the right frequency band that would provide the highest reliability for daily communication, all-year and preferably solar cycle round.

PS: Saw the CB sub-board, maybe that should/could be expanded to general license-free comms (to include PMR446 for instance) and add an NVIS subboard.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on August 16, 2017, 08:22:04 AM
Hello and welcome aboard :-)

The most reliable band for NVIS is 80m.  Don't ditch the 2m band... Using USB on 2m can greatly increase its range. 2m USB can cover the near-regional range and 80m the far-regional range. Both can work DX under some conditions, especially 80m. Any band works for local, so we might as well use VHF or UHF with shorter antennas.

Gil

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Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Commsguy on August 23, 2017, 12:35:54 PM

The most reliable band for NVIS is 80m.
What would be the most reliable time of day to establish an communication on 80m? Early Morning, Noon, afternoon or at night/midnight? And I also reckon seasonal change would have a large impact on this as well, so I'd love to have some more info on that

Don't ditch the 2m band... Using USB on 2m can greatly increase its range. 2m USB can cover the near-regional range and 80m the far-regional range.
2m would be a great band too, but unless you're within omni-directional range(saw your video on it) you'd also need to know someones bearing to use SSB with an Yagi antenna, plus there are a few more factors, like me suspecting I'd need access to two buildings in order to cope with the rather flat terrain.


In any case the most prominent limiting factor for the set-up in mind is the cost of a second, third or fourth rig that can operate the desired band and mode. Since I am the commsguy in my prepping group, I have a nice QRP do-all rig, but now I am looking to create a set-up for the other people in our group with a means to communicate "when SHTF". I've been looking at the recently announced QRP-Labs single band CW transceiver, which looks promising even for people who don't know morse code since it has a built-in decoder and message keyer.
https://www.qrp-labs.com/qcx.html

That way some very basic communication can happen, which would have effect on further SHTF-plan execution and decision-making for both parties communicating, or scheduling a rendez-vous point and time for instance. I'm not aiming for long rag-chews but short, easy & "robust" pre-selected messages that can deliver a situational report to other members

I've gained a lot of "inspiration" for what I'm trying to achieve from Guerrillacomm NVIS experiments, which I'm sort of trying to copy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_F_2BcfqC0
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on August 23, 2017, 12:50:25 PM
Quote
What would be the most reliable time of day to establish an communication on 80m? Early Morning, Noon, afternoon or at night/midnight? And I also reckon seasonal change would have a large impact on this as well, so I'd love to have some more info on that

80m will work better after sunset and in winter.

Quote
I'd need access to two buildings in order to cope with the rather flat terrain.

The trick here is to put your antenna on a mast or hung from a tree branch. 2m indeed will not work well with an antenna close to the ground, unlike NVIS on 80m.

Gil.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: Commsguy on August 23, 2017, 01:45:34 PM
Quote
What would be the most reliable time of day to establish an communication on 80m? Early Morning, Noon, afternoon or at night/midnight? And I also reckon seasonal change would have a large impact on this as well, so I'd love to have some more info on that

80m will work better after sunset and in winter.
So winter is in general better on 80m, and in both winter and summer it would work better after sunset.

Studying VOACAP all-year prediction gives a different result though, link probability gives higher reliability around noon during the winter, and probability drops to zero at sunset in the winter(around 1700h), opening later again at 2300h.
In the summer however VOACAP gives almost a round-the clock consistent link probability, almost not dropping below 90% for the entire day except between 2000h and 0500h

Quote
I'd need access to two buildings in order to cope with the rather flat terrain.

The trick here is to put your antenna on a mast or hung from a tree branch. 2m indeed will not work well with an antenna close to the ground, unlike NVIS on 80m.
I don't know what kind of height you were thinking of for 2m but I was planning on an 80m dipole at about 10 meters using a tree as a center support. It's easy to throw a small heavy object over a tree branch and get to that height.

Using a tree for a 2m SSB, it would be pretty hard to get above the general canopy/building roof height around here. A dipole is much easier to deploy the right way the first time.

I think it'd best if this discussion was set forth in a new thread, this thread being a welcome thread and all
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: scarr on August 23, 2017, 06:12:00 PM
Commsguy - VOACAP is correct - in winter months during lows in the solar cycle (like now) 80M generally becomes a DX band after dark.

During highs in the solar cycle, like last time, on average I found 40M the best NVIS/regional comms band during both day and night - sometimes even 30M was good during the day and 80M would be very good for regional comms in the dead of night and just before dawn.

To explain what I mean by regional comms - I live in Ireland and if I wanted to have somewhat reliable winter night, solar minimum, regional NVIS/regional comms across this island, or into Britain, I'd need to be on 160M.

I strongly advise you to regularly check live foF2 readings in your region - it's the magic critical frequency: http://www.digisonde.com/stationlist.html

If I could give one other piece of advice: in the time I've been licensed, I've learned there is no single magic band that's always reliable - so frequency agility is a must.

Say last weekend for example; I was using the radio for a couple of hours and the conditions were dire on 20/30/40/80 - I decided to go up to 10M (but we're in the solar minimum, it's probably not going to work!) and conditions were brilliant, I was getting all over Europe.

Whether it was sunspots, or Sporadic E's.... being able to switch bands made communications possible.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: swxx on August 23, 2017, 11:12:29 PM
I can't find the context of the original quoted question:

"What would be the most reliable time of day to establish an communication on 80m? Early Morning, Noon, afternoon or at night/midnight?" but the answer depends on the location you are in the world, and the location of the other station! Is it 10,000km away or 10km or 100 or 1000? 80m generally speaking offers only local contacts up to a few hundred km during the day, but thousands of km (or more) depending on the antenna, at night. Near the equator there is a lot more static on 80m than at mid latitudes. Signals during the day are absorbed by the D layer, so don't reflect (refract) well hence short distances, again more so in summer than winter. You may look at 80m as being a band that favors darkness over light. BUT for short distances and NVIS at mid to high latitudes it is good. At mid to high latitudes at night though you especially need to make sure you have a horizontal dipole at a low height compared to 80m wavelength, as a vertical is more likely to give you sky wave reflection of F layer, not blocked by D layer, resulting in large dead "skip zone" before landing back to earth far away, for long distance "DX" contacts.

This plot of how a dipole radiates (low angles to the left and right are for long distance, you want the high straight up lobes for close-in contacts) at various heights, this is for 40m. It would be more helpful if I found one that gives height in relation to wavelength, but to make this valid exactly the same for 80m, simply double the heights given, e.g. the 10m high plot on this 40m graph would be 20m high on 80m, etc. Don't worry about the exact frequency, it will be much the same for 3.5 or 3.7 MHz in this case!

(http://www.antennablog.net/images/40mDipole/allelevplots.gif)

Look at the red line: this is what a dipole up 15m on 80m band would look like, so NVIS even at that height, and few can get an 80m dipole up that high! Look at the green line, if you can get it up 60m in the air, you will have BOTH low angle AND high angle but less intermediate angle radiation: good for local NVIS and long distance. But who can get it up 60m? But on 10m band you can get that green pattern at just 7.5m above normal ground. 10m of course is not much use at this part of the sunspot cycle, we have to wait many years, if ever, to get those good conditions again.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: red90 on November 02, 2017, 08:17:54 PM
Information is a vital commodity in a disaster situation. Whomever has any, in the absence of Internet, phone and power services will have a great advantage.

Radio Preppers aims to provide individuals interested in disaster preparedness with an independent tool for the exchange of information about emergency radio communications and preparations. Hopefully it will also help build a community of like-minded individuals who could contact and help each others in times of what is commonly known as 'SHTF' or 'TEOTWAWKI.' Like-minded here means self-sufficient, strong-willed and responsible people. Independent means regardless of nationality, race, gender, political and religious beliefs, as well as unrelated to any organizations. Whether you are a licensed HAM operator, CBer, or simply curious about radio preparedness doesn't matter here.

My motivation for creating this site came from my inability to find an emergency radio club that really wasn't related to some kind of organization, mostly governmental or politically affiliated. Survival is a personal, family or small community affair. I am always suspicious of organizations that plan on telling people what to do for their own good, or else... That said, anti-government rhetoric will not be accepted here. If you don't like your government, vote accordingly. There are plenty of other boads for political ranting. This one is not one of them.

Sign-up, it's free, and stop by once in a while. If you have anything to contribute, please do so! Topics will not necessarily be limited to radio but must be related to disaster preparedness. To avoid spamming, you do need to answer a couple radio related questions; nothing a quick Google search can't answer.

Rules are few: Be courteous. Although some civil political discussions are acceptable, try to avoid them; same goes for religion. Do not suggest anything against the law, or you will be immediately banned.

Please consider supporting this site after joining by subscribing at: Profile > Summary > Actions > Paid Subscriptions. You will get more privileges!

Note that members who do not participate at least once a year will be deleted.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. I hope you enjoy this forum and that it helps make you and your family safer.

Gil.
Finally bought a hand held ham radio going to start studying

Sent from my 5049Z using Tapatalk

Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on November 03, 2017, 04:33:50 AM
Excellent. The Technician license is easy. You might want to check the General book, it might convince you to give it a shot as well...

Gil.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: red90 on November 05, 2017, 05:45:47 PM
Excellent. The Technician license is easy. You might want to check the General book, it might convince you to give it a shot as well...

Gil.
I will definitely be doing that I just have a lot going on right now so it's kind of hard to even make time. Radio is a perfect IV for someone like me though I've always been the person that has to know how things work and then I have to improve the mousetrap lol

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Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: okcrt104 on November 06, 2017, 12:43:12 AM
I am just wanting to check in and say thanks for this forum I feel as well it is long over due

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Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on November 06, 2017, 02:52:58 AM
Welcome aboard  :)
Gil.
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: brian44 on November 12, 2017, 11:37:25 PM
Hello , Ive been back to ham radio after years of absence , am interested in qrp..like this site and videos Gil has ..dont know much about battery for qrp , thanks , brian
Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: kb1dzc on November 13, 2017, 02:51:21 AM
Information is a vital commodity in a disaster situation. Whomever has any, in the absence of Internet, phone and power services will have a great advantage.

Radio Preppers aims to provide individuals interested in disaster preparedness with an independent tool for the exchange of information about emergency radio communications and preparations. Hopefully it will also help build a community of like-minded individuals who could contact and help each others in times of what is commonly known as 'SHTF' or 'TEOTWAWKI.' Like-minded here means self-sufficient, strong-willed and responsible people. Independent means regardless of nationality, race, gender, political and religious beliefs, as well as unrelated to any organizations. Whether you are a licensed HAM operator, CBer, or simply curious about radio preparedness doesn't matter here.

My motivation for creating this site came from my inability to find an emergency radio club that really wasn't related to some kind of organization, mostly governmental or politically affiliated. Survival is a personal, family or small community affair. I am always suspicious of organizations that plan on telling people what to do for their own good, or else... That said, anti-government rhetoric will not be accepted here. If you don't like your government, vote accordingly. There are plenty of other boads for political ranting. This one is not one of them.

Sign-up, it's free, and stop by once in a while. If you have anything to contribute, please do so! Topics will not necessarily be limited to radio but must be related to disaster preparedness. To avoid spamming, you do need to answer a couple radio related questions; nothing a quick Google search can't answer.

Rules are few: Be courteous. Although some civil political discussions are acceptable, try to avoid them; same goes for religion. Do not suggest anything against the law, or you will be immediately banned.

Please consider supporting this site after joining by subscribing at: Profile > Summary > Actions > Paid Subscriptions. You will get more privileges!

Note that members who do not participate at least once a year will be deleted.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. I hope you enjoy this forum and that it helps make you and your family safer.

Gil.
Sorry but I did not know that this is a chat room that you have to pay for. Yes I am a ham radio operator and proud of it. But I am not associated with any club to say, but have knowledge of proper radio edicate and many ideas that might help some people that are new to the game.

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Title: Re: PLEASE READ! Welcome to Radio Preppers.
Post by: gil on November 13, 2017, 03:59:04 AM
Quote
Sorry but I did not know that this is a chat room that you have to pay for.

Hello,

No, you don't have to, but you can if you want to.

Gil.