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Messages - gil

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 168
31
Tactical Corner / Re: Nuclear War Survival How To Survive a Nuclear War
« on: August 31, 2017, 02:21:19 PM »
Good points. I think radio would be most important after chaos subsides, or sooner in already organized groups, simply using handhelds. The worse the crisis, the later radio networks would bloom, and only for those who planned for it and can generate power. For more regional emergencies it might be different.

Gil

Sent from my SM-G928F using Tapatalk


32
Morse Code / Elecraft K1 Discontinued!
« on: August 31, 2017, 03:52:17 AM »
Sad sad day today as Elecraft removed the K1 from its products line.
I wish they would make a surface-mount version...

 Gil.

33
Tactical Corner / Re: Nuclear War Survival How To Survive a Nuclear War
« on: August 31, 2017, 03:46:39 AM »
Quote
A thought: for some of us will TEOTWAWKI really be so bad as we all think?

Much worse than we think IMHO. There are a LOT of things that we would miss that do not come to mind. The violence between survivors would probably be pretty bad as well. The simple lack of modern medicine would cost a lot of lives. Sure, information would help and might make all the difference, but communications would not be our primary or even secondary concern...

Gil.

34
Technical Corner / Re: New QRP Labs 5W CW Transceiver Kit.
« on: August 31, 2017, 03:39:18 AM »
Quote
I'm kind of surprised Hans didn't one Mosfet vs three of the smaller BS-170's.

Steve Weber uses the same scheme for his MTR series. I bet that's where he got the idea...

Gil.

35
Net Activity / Re: Global Radio Relay Network
« on: August 30, 2017, 12:25:00 PM »
Quote
I was initially thinking that contacts should have to be made using off grid power

I'd say that members should have the ability to operate on batteries and charge them without grid power, as a condition for joining.

Gil.

36
Net Activity / Re: Global Radio Relay Network
« on: August 30, 2017, 03:47:14 AM »
Quote
CW ruled and ran when other systems began to (simulate) no fuel for generators & etc. as would happen in a wide area emergency. No computers, interface boxes and more needed.

It's funny how this is so obvious to those who have tried it in the field. Others need simulations... It's not hard to imagine that a generator will quickly run out of gas, or that eventually the gas will go bad. Soon or later only QRP rig will remain.

Quote
Power levels were anywhere from modest to ridiculously low.

100mW!

Quote
Would be great to have it all on a map eventually!

Turns out, I'm a programmer :o

WRRA? Word Radio Relay Association?

Suggestions?

Gil.

37
Net Activity / Re: Global Radio Relay Network
« on: August 29, 2017, 03:42:00 PM »
Here is how to do this with CW (or whatever else, but CW preferred):

Instead of signing up people to create a network, we should use existing paths opened by those who hold regular skeds with friends. Ray and I were doing this for a long time, and this is the reason I thought of it... Lots of CW operators already have friends they "talk" to regularly. It would be much easier to sign-up existing pairs and map them between grid squares. This would give us a world map full of lines going from A to B in each case. Then we could connect the dots into a network! So everyone with a copy of the map would know the shortest path and alternates possible to relay a message. Every operator would try to make contact with other pairs who's sked would be published (only accessible to members). This way everyone operates at times convenient to them and frequencies that work between them, but they know who they can connect to if needed. These secondary paths would be recorded as well. So we'd have primary pairs/paths and secondary paths, the whole making a giant network.

The result would be a map and table with identification and location (approximate) of paths, times and frequencies.

Am I making sense?

Gil.

38
Tactical Corner / Re: Nuclear War Survival How To Survive a Nuclear War
« on: August 29, 2017, 03:20:51 PM »
#1 doesn't make me feel any better...

Gil.

39
Quote
You know what, there really IS NOT an ideal QRP rig out there at all!

I've been saying this for a long time! Hence my recent post on crowd funding one...

The ideal QRP rig for me would be an MTR4b coupled with a DSB transceiver, built into a strong cast aluminum watertight case...

Gil.

40
Radio Reviews, Questions and Comments. / Re: 40m Most Useful Single Band
« on: August 28, 2017, 05:06:40 PM »
Quote
With the money I've spent on all the little QRP rigs I've purchased I could easily have bought an FT-817 and had money to spare for the MTR kit.

Bob, I sort of came to the same conclusion. Even my KX2 isn't ideal for my kind of operating. The FT-817nd really has it all. Its only problem is the current draw, but that can be worked around, at the cost of some weight and space, namely a slightly bigger battery and maybe larger solar panel.

I don't regret buying all the other radios, mainly because I enjoy building them from kits, and if all you had was an FT-817nd and it failed, you would be SOOL. I still might buy one, or an MFJ-9402 to complete my KX2, the jury is still out. The KX2 is an awesome CW machine, but I have a hard time getting attached to it for some reason, like my KX3. I was much more enamored with my K1 (rip!).

If I wanted a CW-only radio I'd get the MTR4b, hands down. Something else I might get as well since I have two PRC-320 HF military manpacks... Maybe that's all the HF SSB I need.

Still, one FT-817nd can replace all my radios, and then some... You can't have it all... Unfortunately, if Yaesu revamped it, it might draw more current! Unless they learned their lesson... Nothing else out there comes close, that I know of, and I am not counting Chinese rigs, which might be good, but a buying risk regarding reliability and customer service.

Gil.

41
This is an old thread, but I would now suggest at least a four-band radio, 20,30,40 and 80m, with a general coverage receiver. A VHF/UHF handheld is a must also of course.

Gil.

42
Net Activity / Re: Global Radio Relay Network
« on: August 28, 2017, 04:49:25 PM »
I have thought about this before, more than once, even tried to get people here to meet online. I has never worked. This is the main issue in traffic handling groups, all of them, getting people on the air at the right time, regularly. There are nets, yes, I participate in VMARS as often as I can. Those people are very dedicated.

Though Morse code is best for the task, it is slow, and we all have lives outside of radio. It is naturally difficult to get enough people to not only join, the easiest part, and actually get them to keep an air schedule.

That said, I do think there should be a telegraph radio system allowing the relay of a radiogram to anyone within walking distance of an amateur radio station. How to do it is open to debate. It would certainly take time and money, to which I would be a willing participant. Others have tried and failed. Who here has ever heard an ARRL NTS operator on the air? I haven't, and I suspect there is very little traffic of that nature on the bands.

It is a big commitment...

Let's see what comes out of this thread...

Gil.

43
Quote
What kind of power would do the trick at that distance? How many elements would you reckon to be suffice for that distance? A simple 3-element measuring tape yagi or an antenna with more elements?

It isn't so much a power and gain issue but an antenna height issue. Get your antenna high enough and 75 miles should work. I would use a 6 or 7el. Yagi, as any more becomes quickly unwieldy. They are easy and cheap to make. Look at the portable design I made with the elements held by clothespins. You could make a similar fixed design.

Quote
How critical would it be to know someone's bearing? Does it have to be within a few degrees of accuracy?

It depends on the antenna design and the number of elements. The more elements you add the more narrow it gets. That's how the gain is created, there is no magical amplification going on, it's only achieved by directivity.

You really might want to try both, 2m SSB and NVIS, this way you can cover from zero to hundreds of miles.

Gil.

44
Either 2m ssb or 80m NVIS should work. For 75 miles I would go 2m ssb with a Yagi. This way you do not rely on the ionosphere at all. You don't have to worry about your dipole height for 80m. You'll never get it high enough to lower the angle of radiation. For 40m I'd use the super gain NVIS antenna. See the corresponding thread. For your 80m antenna, use a reflector wire under it, 5% longer...

Gil

Sent from my SM-G928F using Tapatalk


45
Technical Corner / Re: The $11 Frog Sounds CW Transceiver.
« on: August 28, 2017, 09:04:08 AM »
I switched the crystals to 7030. It works fine and you get a sidetone, unlike the Pixie. No contacts yet, but I tried only once.

Gil

Sent from my SM-G928F using Tapatalk


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