Bitcoin donations to: 1CE9UfWJcHBYkWPns7iqBqZgKhd5xfqEaM thanks!
Buy Bitcoins easily by clicking HERE and get $10 in free bitcoins!

Author Topic: Trisquare eXRS radios  (Read 6322 times)

Mitch

  • Guest
Trisquare eXRS radios
« on: October 05, 2012, 09:14:25 AM »
I'd like to know if anyone has first hand experience with these radios. There are several reviews on Amazon, but my level of trust in Amazon reviews isn't very high.

These seem like a good short range SHTF handheld solution. If nothing else someone has to find what channel you are using out of the billions available.

Added: http://www.trisquare.us/index.html

deanathpc

  • Guest
Re: Trisquare eXRS radios
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2012, 09:31:05 AM »
Look pretty cool. I know 900 mhz spread spectrum has been around for years.

I used to work for a company that produced an industrial version.  They were used for our state lottery machines to communicate between machines and their hq. Not sure if that is still the case.  I worked on these radios for a couple of years.

It's not completely private but would reduce the issue of eaves droppers.  I'd love to try the higher end ones with the texting capabilities.

Mitch

  • Guest
Re: Trisquare eXRS radios
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2012, 09:47:53 AM »
Excellent!

I'm bursting with questions like:

Are the 50 frequency combinations set or are they also different per manufacturer/service? Put another way, is there some kind of standardization they all have to follow in picking frequency sets like an IEEE standard?

I know the 900MHz area of the spectrum acts similar to the 440MHz amateur band with respect to line-of-sight distance, but is there more or less interference from rain/snow outdoors?

The higher frequency penetration into buildings seems to be better, is this from increased signal scattering around corners or is it just the smaller wavelength needs a smaller crack to "get through"? Now I'm wondering what the specific absorption rates for RF energy are for different building materials. That might occupy a week or more's research...

The FCC seems to be somewhat "hands off" in this end of spectrum use for now; do you think it may become more regulated in the near future? Opinions welcome!

<best Johnnie #5 voice> Need more input!


Mitch

  • Guest
Re: Trisquare eXRS radios
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2012, 10:01:49 AM »
A little more reviewer information I trust more than Amazon users:

http://www.eham.net/ehamforum/smf/index.php/topic,48923.0.html


deanathpc

  • Guest
Re: Trisquare eXRS radios
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2012, 10:14:00 AM »
I would trust those reviews too.

That is where I go when I'm looking at a ham radio.

White Tiger

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 525
  • SMeter: +11/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Trisquare eXRS radios
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2012, 08:58:42 AM »
I liked KE3WD's eHam review/question - could it be used as a spread spectrum, amateur exciter/receiver?

...but it still sounds like a 1 watt, line of sight/limited range, HH. As KD8DVR stated in his eHam review: It's lone benefit seems to be that once FRS becomes crowded, this would allow your family to communicate in close proximity, without interference.

It could also offer a bit more channelized security/limtied access - for if you're group were on a patrol, herding cattle, etc.,
If you're looking for me, you're probably looking in the wrong place.

gil

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2641
  • SMeter: +70/-3
    • View Profile
    • Radio Preppers
Re: Trisquare eXRS radios
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2012, 10:52:42 AM »
NXDN might be the answer for Ham bands.

Gil.

White Tiger

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 525
  • SMeter: +11/-0
    • View Profile
Trisquare eXRS radios
« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2012, 02:14:39 AM »
NXDN might be the answer for Ham bands.

Gil.

What's that Gil?
If you're looking for me, you're probably looking in the wrong place.

gil

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2641
  • SMeter: +70/-3
    • View Profile
    • Radio Preppers
Re: Trisquare eXRS radios
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2012, 02:46:22 AM »
I just found out myself. Some guys were talking about it on a local repeater: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NXDN. They are upgrading their repeaters to this new mode. Presumably, it adds ten miles of range to FM radios. It is digital voice. So, you do get some extra privacy, right now anyway, because there aren't many around yet. Icom and Kenwood make the radios...

Gil.

White Tiger

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 525
  • SMeter: +11/-0
    • View Profile
Trisquare eXRS radios
« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2012, 05:41:23 PM »
I read a little about it - It still seems to be a HT, and therefore would still need to require line-of-sight to the repeater in order to gain the extra distance?

I do agree that because it's new - it will (initially) allow folks to escape the crowded FRS frequencies and therefore should (also initially) offer more OPSEC.

The wiki post said it utilized an specialized encoder that allowed for voice compression AND Frequency Shift Keying for data (FSK). It uses AMBE which is the same system used by D-Star - so that usage restriction will irritate Amateur Radio folks. Apparently this little rig has some interesting capabilities and is a FCC part 90 compliant device as well.
If you're looking for me, you're probably looking in the wrong place.

Rob_ma

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 58
  • SMeter: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Trisquare eXRS radios
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2013, 01:05:33 PM »
I just found out myself. Some guys were talking about it on a local repeater: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NXDN. They are upgrading their repeaters to this new mode. Presumably, it adds ten miles of range to FM radios. It is digital voice. So, you do get some extra privacy, right now anyway, because there aren't many around yet. Icom and Kenwood make the radios...

Gil.

Digital, even NXDN, doesn't really add range to your system. It does allow weaker signals to be received like they were standing next to you (no white noise). The trouble with digital is that if you are on the fringe you don't have the advantage being able to receive a really weak signal any longer. It is either there or not there. Nothing is more frustrating trying to communicate with a user on the fringe using digital radios!

That is one of the reasons most fire departments won't use digital for fireground use. The other is try standing next to someone with a radio on the same frequency and the delayed echo drives you nuts!

I have lots of personal experience with NXDN. I set up a NXDN repeater at work in dual analog/digital mode and one of the big advantages is no eavesdropping. We use it for confidential info in digital mode and regular comms in analog mode.

- Rob