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Messages - Quietus

Pages: [1] 2
1
Tactical Corner / Re: Tripod for Camo Pole Type Masts
« on: November 03, 2013, 06:02:52 PM »
I think that you are asking for quite a lot, ie the ability to raise ten sticks of noodly aluminum camo net poles via a tripod.  There might be something out there for that.
 
I sort of specialize in noodley, and yours is quite the task.  Not saying that there is not an item out there to raise a mast into your socket, just saying that ten sticks is quite a lot to stabilize, both coming up to vertical and to stabilize the mast once its raised.
 
Have you figured where you might put intervening stay plates on your ten-stick mast, and how the guy ropes will play nicely amongst themselves as you raise the mast by yourself?  If you find yourself convinced that it might be nice to put out guy ropes from the mast, then how and of what material are you going to make those stay plates?  The spreader wands of camo net poles lend themselves well to being cut down for stay plates and guy ropes.
 
Best of luck to you on raising and stabilizing a tall field expiedent mast.  Your f/e wants are pretty tall at ten sticks, especially if you're set on using the pictured swivel mount.  Might be best, if a tall noogly mast is wanted, to re-define how that might happen for you.  Might be just as easy to start from ground level and ignore the swivel mount, that will save you multiple trips of climbing into your truck bed as a lone antenna erector.

2
General Discussion / Re: Interesting video.
« on: September 16, 2013, 09:52:03 PM »

[/quote]

Sadly, I've yet to need to open my wallet.

[/quote



A wise old Squid corpsman once told me regarding people:  "Keep your expectations low enough, and you'll seldom be disappointed."  True dat.

3
General Discussion / Re: Preppers to be treated as terrorists
« on: September 10, 2013, 10:46:52 PM »
Good idea, better start a new thread...
Gil.
 
Fine idea sir.  As an edumacation for people newer into the struggle against Marxism, I'd have to recommend that the War Between the States books be kept on the back burner, since there's probably more pressing subjects.
 
KKOG's recommendations of Bracken's works are spot on.  If buying or choosing only one of the three, choose the third of Brackens trilogy on Enemies.  That book brings it home, especially to people who live in the south.
 
I've read the other two of Bracken's first two, and can pass on them as being important for a list of books to read.  Of course, once you've read the third, you will want to read the other two.
 
Castigo Key, I could pass on as a recommended read, it's more of a pleasurable one.
 
KKOG's recommendation of John Shaw's Unintended Consequences cannot be disputed.  Everybody needs to read that book, it's from the Clinton era and tells how one person and his buds foil the bad people.  The book is written in small segments that start more than a hundred years ago.  It is easy to pick up at the last place you put it down. I ordered one when it first came out, and found another for cheap.  Each of them have been kept in circulation within my circle.  And I've gotten both of them back, which may say something about the better folks
 
Anybody who thinks currently that he is a rational person, has to have gotten Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged under his belt.  It is a hard slog, but worthwhile.  As is most anything else that she has written.  I recall sitting on M1956 web gear in the mountains of southern Utah a generation or so ago, diving into my pack while waiting for a helicopter to come take me up the line.  What generally came out of the pack, was an Ayn Rand paperback of essays.
 
Cheers, Gil, on your reading list solicitations.

4
General Discussion / Re: Preppers to be treated as terrorists
« on: September 10, 2013, 09:57:28 PM »
I second the choice of Shelby Foote's three-volume set as recommended just above by raybiker73.  Foote has been maybe the best writer to chronicle the whole conflict.  His writing flows as prose.  Some years back during a TV series on that war, there was numerous interviews with Foote.  They were a joy to watch, a gentleman talking about what he knew better than most anyone.
 
Foote's trilogy took some years to write; copywright dates are from 1958 for the first volume, to 1974 for the third.  I think he may have been a company-grade redleg officer during WW2. 
 
Gil, if you are looking for something from the southern perspective:  read Shrouds of Glory by Winston Groom (Forrest Gump author).  The book is about a lesser-known campaign waged by the south after Atlanta had been lost.  Intent was to do a left hook out of lost Atlanta and capture Nashville, while cutting off Sherman's sources of supply.  The campaign didn't go real well.  Hood's army got to the outskirts of Nashville during Dec 1864 just about as Sherman's was reaching the Georgia coast at Savannah,sans supplies since Sherman provided/looted as he went.  Oops.  And then Hood's army got driven off from Nashville's outskirts, badly.  It had gone up to Nashville just as badly.  The attack into Franklin TN which lost twelve generals for the confederacy, may have been a punishing action for his army on the part of Hood, and he was using some decent drugs due to wound and amputation status at the time.
 
Trace Adkins' song that plays in commercials asking for money for current wounded vets, begins with the singer saying that he was at Nashville.  He got pounded there by Hood.  In that book, there is a quote from a contemporary about how Hood wanted to forge an axe of the Army of Tennessee.  He got blunted, so the forging got to be a froe.  In the end, it was a wedge.
 
Anyway, good book, I've given it off but intend to go to the library and read it again.  Gil, it will fulfill your wish for the tactical side of a narrative.  Small campaign, big book.  And it will bring in the human side of failed leadership:  one army passing another fifty yards away in the night, while leadership was having a soiree with the locals.  Punishment soon after at Franklin.  And all within the shadow of leadership coming from primitive painkillers.
 
ETA while starting to post:  Well eff me.  Maybe there should be a suggested reading list here where people can put out what they think a RadioPrepper sort of a person ought to get his mind around.  There's a person on the training side of life's equation, who says that ham radio operators will be among the first to rat you out to the proper authorities (that would, of course, be right behind your family and close neighbors.)  I like the concept.  What do people here recommend for a reading list?  I vote for books seconded by people who know American history.

5
Antennas / Re: "Portable" Antennas
« on: September 10, 2013, 09:05:26 PM »
IZ2UUF:  Thanks for sharing those pics and welcome.

6
VHF and Above / Re: Baofeng UV-5R+
« on: September 07, 2013, 09:01:30 PM »
Not to mention that the radio can be programmed with FRS, GMRS and MURS frequencies, though transmitting would be illegal on these bands.





Gil.
 

 
Was wondering why you would be concerned about such a thing, that radio's transmit power being too strong for some bands.
 
I would think of transmitting on those bands, with that power, as an easy no-brainer effort to harden the mind for bad times.  Part of the hardening, is to willfully commit a misdemeanor per day, and a felony per week.
 
 That concept was put out several years ago on a more political site, Western Rifle Shooter's Association.  I do think that deliberate lawbreaking is a fine thing, if kept  somewhat in check to protect a person's ability to continue to run free and keep breaking laws.
 
For sure, any crimes committed during that heart-hardened way of life, must be directed at authority, not at people.  A couple of watts extra on transmit running a Chicom handheld radio,  is a harm to no one, and  running it on those prohibited bands helps you to be an outlaw in one of the smaller parts of life.  That's a very small start to outlaw status.  But as the wise man said, if you are not on some government watch list by this time in your life, you should be embarrased.

7
General Discussion / Re: Backpacks
« on: September 07, 2013, 05:44:16 PM »
One positive attribute of the un-modified Alice rucks, is that they have made a lot more good men than they have destroyed.  A person might say that they are "mind developers."
 
The Hellcat is a pretty good mod of the Alice, and can be done for less than $50.  It makes the green tick better, but may not solve CG issues.
 
I have a non-current generation MOLLE II ruck.  It's got a frame that's made of better materials than older ones which apparently were prone to breakage.  It rides better (for me) than the Hellcat, but its one external pocket is not such a great feature, more would be better (Alice, anyone?)  Adding the huge sustainment pouches makes the rig real wide, another bad feature.  The newer MOLLE II rucks have done away with the separate sleeping system carrier, now there is a half-moon zipper at the bottom of the larger bag.  They have also done away with the one external pocket that the old one had-  a bad thing.
 
Currently I'm running a more old-school Bergen-type:  an Eagle Becker Patrol pack.  It has six external pockets, and good organization for storage inside the main bag.  But it does not have any frame, which is uncommon for a pack of this size.  The challenge with this pack, is to keep the load light.  I wouldn't want to go over forty pounds with it
 
ETA:  I've been looking harder at what is currently being sold for MOLLE II rucks from www.entrygear.com, scroll for Specialty Defense Systems products.
 
That larger ruck bag has much for PALS attachments.  So a person could customize the MOLLE pouches he puts on the bag.  Might be able to get it better for outside pockets, than the so-much-hated large Alice.  $175 plus what you already own for pouches, etc., that would make this pack better for you.  That price is for Woodland.  Double it for Multi-cam. 

8
General Discussion / Re: What if you could only have one band?
« on: September 06, 2013, 11:03:06 PM »
For my purposes, it would be 80m.  Same NVIS arguments as above in favor of 40m.  But in my AO, 80m is where potential friends are on the nigthly check-ins on the Wyoming Cowboy net.  The house dipole cut for @3.800 works well.
 
For this board, being able to put up a 16-20' mast on short notice for the consenus 40m is a good thing.  What do you stabilize that 40m dipole wire with?  Maybe with an 80m wire.  Or, you can set up that short mast and put 80m and 40m wires in the same axis, one being beneath the other.  Then use a 60m cross-wire to stabilize the both., and you know that there's much privacy on the few alloted 60m band freqs.  That works fine. 
 
Simplicity rules, though.  Put up the 80m wire and stabilize it with a 40m wire on a short mast.  You will get the close concept, and maybe some distance, depending on end height of wires. 

9
General Discussion / Re: Nothing
« on: July 24, 2013, 10:58:15 PM »
Spent it camping for two nights across the border in a twisted multi-jurisdictional area (that means good things re privacy, you're out at the end of various entities' AOs).  Talked at some length, at his place of business, to a fire tower lookout who had been doing the gig for 35 years in different spots. He had just a tetch of sheepherder's syndrome.  Learned the nomenclature of the actual lookout structure (L-4) and later found plans for building one online.  Wish I had a photographic memory... he presented me with his fifteen channel list of what's available to him on VHF/UHF in response to a real innocent(!) question.
 
Bright spot was jumping a black bear at thirty yards while on a morning walk.  He was most scared, all I saw for several seconds through the trees, was assholes and elbows as he crashed away.

10
Tactical Corner / Re: Water filter
« on: May 19, 2013, 04:08:58 PM »
I've packed a "Sweetwater Guardian" filter and spare cartridge for about ten years.  MSR has apparently bought out Sweetwater, now it's called the MSR  Guardian.  Haven't needed to use it much.  I pack a couple of paper coffee filters and bread ties to secure a cut-down coffee filter to the intake head.  This, in order to help cut the need for filter replacement.
 
When the current easy times of internet ordering of such things comes to an end, it will be a good thing to be able to construct a larger water filter for personal and household use.  I imagine that plans for this are all around the internet.  I got mine in print prior to that from one of the paperback books that a guy named Don Paul wrote and published via primitive computer printing some time back.   (OMG, that's so '90s!)
 
His advice was for use with 55-gal drums, but the filter can be downsized considerably.  Five gallon buckets would work real fine.  Now, might be a handy time to plumb in a bucket lid for hose intake, and the bottom of the bucket for hose outlet.  Inside the bucket, is a multi-layered mix of coarse rock, smaller rock, gravel, and sand.  I'd be wanting to make the lowest layer out of smashed up charcoal briquettes, a bag of them would probably last the lifetime of the filter maker.  (As to that "lifetime" prediction, I think that other events other than water purification may intrude.)

11
General Discussion / Re: Checking in
« on: April 22, 2013, 08:05:37 PM »
Welcome, pavelow.
 
KC9TNH's advice on taking both tech and general on the same day, is real good.  The general material has some backwards overlap to tech material,  so there won't be twice as much studying to do.  As you decide whether to take both tests on the same day, find an ARRL amateur band allocation chart.  Look at it and notice how much is available on a general license, and how (relatively) little there is on a tech license.  And some bands are more "useful" than others, depending on your point of view.  The chart ought to decide it for you:  Take both tests the same day!
 
KC9TNH's advice on hammering the tests online, is what got me my general license in four days of studying. The general study guide was frustrating, so I studied the tests after getting straightened out by KC9TNH.  Took tech five times and general twenty times on eHam.net   When testing for real came, I saw only one question on both tests that I'd not seen before online.

12
General Discussion / Re: 350 QRT
« on: April 21, 2013, 11:39:11 PM »
There is some forum whose name I can't recall, where some people are told that "your rucksack is in the hall."

13
Shutting down cell phone service in a hurry is just not possible.  That action requires jumping through some significant legal hoops, otherwise (no matter who does it) it is known popularly as "interfering with communications" under federal law and is illegal, absent some significant prior judicial permission.  It's just against the law.
 
About a year and a half ago, when the arnichists were doing their thing out in Oakland during the Occupy Wall Street times, word on the street was that people knew the coppers were coming when their cell phones no longer worked.  That was one of those "interfering with communications" events.  Those OWS protests did not rise to a Martin Niemoller  moment for most.  I doubt that a quick tuck 'n trim on cell service anywhere here will raise many eyebrows, as long as it's done for a good cause.
 
America will get used to and may embrace, many more breaches of law as convenience dictates for the law enforcers.

When 9/11 occurred, cell phone service went out.  During the Northeast blackout a couple years later cell phone service went out.  During Hurricane Irene cell phone service went out. During Hurricane Sandy cell phone service went out.  At this point cell service is an indicator whether there is some sort of problem, rather than a useful tool for emergencies.
 
I think you and I are talking about two different sets of circumstances.  In my possibly too sarcastic post, I was talking about deliberate cell phone jamming.  It's occurred during the OWS protests, did occur during a bridge scare back maybe 8-10 years ago on the part of the NYPD (which caused some ruckus and led to some ... rules... being promulgated), , and it routinely occurs during motorcade events.  It is entirely possible from what I've read about the Boston Marathon cell phone service disruption, that jamming occurred.
 
What I was trying to bring in, was the idea of the legalities of cell phone jamming.  There's hoops to jump through at the level of federal judges in order to do that.  Most people realize that the Oakland cell phone jamming events were done without the benefit of judicial process.  As to other events, who knows.  But I know that the bridge/tunnel event that caused the NYPD to jam cell phones, got sorted out in its aftermath in such a way that would supposedly bring about  some more adult supervision to LE operations to jam cell phone traffic.
 
Jamming cell phone signals by anybody, including a government entity, is a violation of FCC rules.  People wanting an exemption from the federal code, must apply for one in front of a judge.
 
What I think you are talking about, with references to 9-11, hurricane events, and electrical grid problems, is a whole different thing.  When something happens, everybody gets on their phones... and cellular service gets overwhelmed by traffic.  The weather events (grid-down) may be another factor in cell phone towers not working.
 
You are certainly correct with your statement "At this point cell phone service is an indicator whether there is some sort of a problem...."   Problem is, we cannot predict with much certainty, where the problem originates, whether overwhelmed systems, physical damage/lack of juice to towers, or deliberate and likely lawless jamming of signals.
 
I stand by my earlier statement that most people either won't care, or will embrace, all efforts in the comms arena that their masters tell them will make them safer.

14
Shutting down cell phone service in a hurry is just not possible.  That action requires jumping through some significant legal hoops, otherwise (no matter who does it) it is known popularly as "interfering with communications" under federal law and is illegal, absent some significant prior judicial permission.  It's just against the law.
 
About a year and a half ago, when the arnichists were doing their thing out in Oakland during the Occupy Wall Street times, word on the street was that people knew the coppers were coming when their cell phones no longer worked.  That was one of those "interfering with communications" events.  Those OWS protests did not rise to a Martin Niemoller  moment for most.  I doubt that a quick tuck 'n trim on cell service anywhere here will raise many eyebrows, as long as it's done for a good cause.
 
America will get used to and may embrace, many more breaches of law as convenience dictates for the law enforcers. 

15
Tactical Corner / Re: Considerations for an Evasion Plan
« on: February 03, 2013, 12:09:37 PM »
The guy at that link knows of what he speaks, having been trained in a part of the military where having bug-out plans is high on the to-do list.
 
One comment on planning:  Whatever your first, second, and third variations work out to be, don't call that good enough even if you're capable of executing each variation.  Throw Murphy into the mix, and see how it's necessary to figure workarounds for each variation. 
 
I forget the author of the famous quote, but it goes something like "no good plan survives first contact with...   "

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