Anyone so new they don't even have a radio yet?

Started by White Tiger, September 27, 2012, 03:30:54 am

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gil

Quotepreferably encrypted.


However, in most other countries, encryption is prohibited and would land you in jail..
An SD card would certainly work. Photocopies for travel might be best.
For traveling, I would even suggest declaring your passport lost before leaving to get a new one. This way you have two. One to carry with you if required, the other one to keep in a safe place.

Gil.

White Tiger

Quote from: Geek on February 20, 2013, 07:30:54 pm
What I have done for other important documents is scan them and then I can put them on a thumb drive, Kindle, phone, etc.  A thumb drive then goes in each BOB along with paper copies of driver's licenses, etc.  I would do the same for any new radios as well.
I've thought about this too. I have printed-off a few key documents...on the off-chance of some type of EMP event - but dumping a memory stick into my EMP box is just as easy...and slipping the laptop into a non-static/non-EMP envelope would supply some protection...but It's not like I'm going around with my laptop slipped in that condition all the time....
If you're looking for me, you're probably looking in the wrong place.

Geek

Quote from: White Tiger on February 20, 2013, 08:52:26 pm
Quote from: Geek on February 20, 2013, 07:30:54 pm
What I have done for other important documents is scan them and then I can put them on a thumb drive, Kindle, phone, etc.  A thumb drive then goes in each BOB along with paper copies of driver's licenses, etc.  I would do the same for any new radios as well.
I've thought about this too. I have printed-off a few key documents...on the off-chance of some type of EMP event - but dumping a memory stick into my EMP box is just as easy...and slipping the laptop into a non-static/non-EMP envelope would supply some protection...but It's not like I'm going around with my laptop slipped in that condition all the time....


That's pretty much what I have done, with copies of the memory stick tossed into each BOB.  I have an old laptop in an anti-static bag in a closet.  If I get really worried about EMP, then I need to put the bag in a metal box or garbage can, etc. but for now the electronics are just in anti-static bags.  However, the copies of the memory sticks can also go into each BOB so if you have a disaster, other than an EMP, where you have to bug out, you've got whatever documents you chose to back up in this fashion.

If you really expect to be referencing these materials, transferring them to a smartphone or eReader and dropping that in an anti-static bag is even better.  You can carry an entire library around if you think you need it.

White Tiger

February 21, 2013, 03:01:02 am #138 Last Edit: February 21, 2013, 03:03:46 am by White Tiger
Quote from: Geek on February 20, 2013, 10:18:28 pm
If you really expect to be referencing these materials, transferring them to a smartphone or eReader and dropping that in an anti-static bag is even better.  You can carry an entire library around if you think you need it.
Geek - this has given me an even more interesting idea!

I'm going to scan/transfer documents into word/.pdf/autocad files...and save them to an e-reader. My Kindle will work well for that, and the other 66 books I have will be safe there too! My iPad has the Kindle reader app on it - so I can pop the old Kindle into the anti-static/anti-EMP BOB case....genius, thanks!
If you're looking for me, you're probably looking in the wrong place.

Geek

If you have replaced a smartphone with a newer model, you can store material on the old phone as well.  Then drop the phone in a anti-static bag.  Make sure you remember chargers and occasionally charge the device as well.  I just went through a cycle of bringing every BOB in and charging the radios.

kc0rzw

Quote from: cockpitbob on February 20, 2013, 08:57:37 am
Quote from: Geek on February 20, 2013, 08:34:52 am
So on my soon to be acquired 2m radio, if I am tuned to the repeater is there another control for the PL tone?
Typically you enter a text name for the repeater, the frequency and the tone.

By far the best thing to do with an HT is to get the programming cable and software.  Often the programming software can be found as free-ware.  As one guy put it, an HT is a computer with a 2" monitor and 16 keys on the keyboard.  They can be really tough to program manually.  Programming them with the computer is easy.




I disagree, for an experienced ham the programming cable might be convenient.  For a newbie, it is important to learn how the radio works, and learn how to program it, or you may be stuck somewhere without your computer and cable.  If you have some frequencies to program, you will be kicking yourself for not knowing how the radio works.

I have heard the Chinese radios are about impossible to manually program, so you may have no choice but to use the cable, but I would still try to figure it out anyway.

raybiker73

Quote from: kc0rzw on February 21, 2013, 11:09:45 am
I disagree, for an experienced ham the programming cable might be convenient.  For a newbie, it is important to learn how the radio works, and learn how to program it, or you may be stuck somewhere without your computer and cable.  If you have some frequencies to program, you will be kicking yourself for not knowing how the radio works.

I have heard the Chinese radios are about impossible to manually program, so you may have no choice but to use the cable, but I would still try to figure it out anyway.


I know the Baofeng UV-5R series is a challenge to program manually, but it can be done. In fact, for me it was do or die, because none of the available drivers would work to connect it to a computer to program it. Unless you've got an XP machine still kicking around, the chances of getting the software to work are hit-or-miss at best.

The Nifty Accessories card for the UV-5R is pretty comprehensive, but even it is cryptic about how to program a repeater. The key is that you have to program the receive, the offset and the transmit separately. I've only found one clear and accurate guide about how to do it:

http://miklor-uv5r.99k.org/UV5R-BuddysQPG.html

If you have a UV-5R series HT, print this out 100 times, save it on a dozen different hard drives, and memorize it besides. You will need it. Otherwise, basic programming isn't too hard.

White Tiger

I should've waited for your post...

Ah well...I do have a couple other quick reference catalogue's and some information coming in the mail soon!
If you're looking for me, you're probably looking in the wrong place.

Geek

I passed the Technician exam this morning.  Time to do some shopping for a radio!

White Tiger

Quote from: Geek on March 09, 2013, 10:21:48 am
I passed the Technician exam this morning.  Time to do some shopping for a radio!


Congratulations Geek!
If you're looking for me, you're probably looking in the wrong place.

gil

Congratulations Geek!

Remember you can do Morse code on some parts of the HF bands!

Gil.

Geek


gil


Geek

Actually, before I consider learning Morse, I would want to go back and take the General exam.  So the plan right now is 1) get a radio and listen, 2) take the General exam, 3) figure out what's next.

gil

That would certainly give you much more bandwidth to play with!