Tactical & Fuel Economy mods for your BOV (Whatever it may be!)

Started by freax, October 29, 2014, 10:12:14 pm

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freax

*Censored*

Joe

I have done most of the upgrades you mention I have a 2005 Toyota Tundra.

#3. Tire pressure I run between 63-65 PSI, I'm running light truck tires got rid of the passenger tires for thicker side walls.

#4. I have a front skid plate (air dam) not only does it help with air flow but protects the front diff. from damage.

#5. As for weight for me there is no way to lighten the load, with the added winch, tool box, head ache rack and other equipment I keep in the truck I have given up. But 15 MPG average around town and 20 MPG average on the highway I'm not complaining.

#8. I run 2 fans on my truck, the stock clutch fan and a electric fan. Added the electric because the clutch only engages off of engine temp and my yota runs on the cold side. It helps keep the transmission temp down and keeps the A/C cold.

#9. I changed the stock battery terminals when I got it and installed military type terminals. Makes adding accessories much easier and cleaner.

#10. I keep a extra fuel cap in the tool box, not only does help in loosing fuel vapor, but fuel injected vehicles run a positive pressure fuel tank and a lose of pressure can cause the check engine light come on.

#11. I only run NGK plugs in it and have put NGK's in all my small engines.

One thing I did do not listed that helped with fuel millage is I added a K&N air filter, it did increase fuel millage and power. And it cleanable which is great on the trail. I also add Sea Foam to a full tank once a month to keep the fuel system clean and running at optimum performance.

Another thing to add, for vehicles with serpentine belt ran accessories is to change the idler bearings when replacing the belt.

Keep your exhaust system in mind also, Toyota are bad for having rusted out mufflers. This can decrease air flow threw the engine causing a drop in fuel millage. I'm looking at replacing mine with dual exhaust this will help with fuel millage and power also.


KK0G

I've made a living out of fixing vehicles for over 20 years and believe me, the all time best method to increase fuel efficiency is to sell your gas guzzler and use the money to buy a more fuel efficient vehicle. While it's true that the things mentioned can increase fuel efficiency, the expense to gain tiny fractional increases is far better spent on something more efficient to begin with.

"Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety" - Benjamin Franklin

KK0G

NavySEAL

I am with you 100% on this one KKOG.......I have been twisting wrenches for many years and if you want to wind up with good mileage start out with good mileage.  freax's suggestions are all viable but don't have a good return on the time and money invested.

Joe

Quote from: KK0G on October 30, 2014, 04:00:26 pm
I've made a living out of fixing vehicles for over 20 years and believe me, the all time best method to increase fuel efficiency is to sell your gas guzzler and use the money to buy a more fuel efficient vehicle. While it's true that the things mentioned can increase fuel efficiency, the expense to gain tiny fractional increases is far better spent on something more efficient to begin with.


Agree with you KK0G the return on investment is not there on bolt on items. For me I plan on adding duel exhaust when its time to replace the current exhaust system. The increase from the K&N is minimal but for the reusability of the filter alone pays for itself. The best way to maintain fuel mileage is maintenance. As you mentioned the best way to increase MPG is to get a new ride.

I'm driving my wife crazy right know because I keep looking for a second truck to set up for fun and also to bug out. But this one will be diesel. For me there more reliable than gas, easier to diagnose and work on (older models), and since I have been working on diesels the last 15 years it makes more since. Plus living out surrounded by farms and tanks of off road diesel has a big factor to. ;D

Lamewolf

Quote from: freax on October 29, 2014, 10:12:14 pm


#2
Narrower tyres.
A reduction in the rolling resistance of the tyres or the total surface area means less fuel needs to be spent to make the car go forwards. If you have wide profile mag wheels you may consider going with more reliable steel ones which won't be damaged and deform if you hit a kerb.




Freak, and others.

Take it from me, I've been in the automotive service industry for almost 40 years.  Steel wheels are not more reliable !  They are heavier than alloy wheels using more fuel, and they sustain damage more easily if hitting a "curb".  Steel bends more easily than some of the lighter weight alloy wheels and even on big semi trucks I've seen steel wheels destroyed by hitting something on the road where the alloy wheels survived.  Seen it thousands of times through the years, so just because its made of steel doesn't mean its stronger !  Also, steel wheels are made by welding them together, and alloy wheels are cast then machined to shape making them more precision than steel.  They are less likely to leak due to pin holes caused by welding steel wheels together.  Give me a good alloy wheel over steel anyday !

Lamewolf

Quote from: freax on February 21, 2015, 05:55:29 am
Quote from: Lamewolf on February 18, 2015, 09:34:45 am
Quote from: freax on October 29, 2014, 10:12:14 pm


#2
Narrower tyres.
A reduction in the rolling resistance of the tyres or the total surface area means less fuel needs to be spent to make the car go forwards. If you have wide profile mag wheels you may consider going with more reliable steel ones which won't be damaged and deform if you hit a kerb.




Freak, and others.

Take it from me, I've been in the automotive service industry for almost 40 years. 



Removed the offending information per request from a qualified reliable source. Thank you for your support! :)


Wasn't offending to me Freax, its just a common misconception that steel wheels are stronger than alloy wheels when in fact they aren't.  On the big rigs, I've seen steer tires blowout on them destroying steel wheels due to bending but with the alloy wheels you can just slap on a new tire and keep rolling with it.  Most times when they blow a steer tire on a steel wheel, the wheel and tire have to be replaced.  Those alloy wheels are some tough stuff !  I do agree with narrow tires though and they also have been proven in some case to provide better traction in mud and snow due to digging down into the hard base better as long as they aren't too narrow !

Also, since its winter and more snow is coming down.  Most folks think that lowering the air pressure of the tires helps it grip snow better when in fact a properly inflated tire is proven to grip better due to it biting into hard packed snow better.  An underinflated tire will more or less float on top and just spin or slip when trying to stop.  Proper inflation helps keep the tread standing erect which makes it bite better, that is if the tires are not worn out and actually have tread left.

EVERYONE KEEP WARM AND SAFE - IT WAS MINUS 19.5 DEGREES YESTERDAY MORNING HERE !